Now showing items 1-9 of 9

    • Basni 

      Krylov, Ivan Andreevich (LenisdamLenizdat. Sankt-PeterburgSt. Petersburg, 1995)
      Here is a standard paperback presentation of the nine books of Krilov's fables. Other than the somewhat forbidding bust of Krilov photographed on the cover, there are no illustrations. There is a T of C at the back. I ...
    • Basni 

      Krilov, I. A. (Machaon Publishing. Moscow, 2001)
      "Here is a fascinating find. The cover looked suspiciously familiar. I checked and I have a book with the same cover illustrations and format and publisher, but it is in Ukrainian and this book is in Russian. A little ...
    • I. A. Krilov: His Representation in Russian Folk Illustration (Russian) 

      Bonch-Bruevich, Vladimir; Klepikov, S. A (Gos. literaturnyĭ muzeĭState Literary Museum. MoscowMoskva, 1950)
      This is a wonderful treasure. It is a canvas-bound book of some eighty pages with a wealth of black-and-white photoreproductions of illustrations of Krilov's work. A foreword includes several illustrations of fables from ...
    • I.A. Krilov: Basni 

      No Author (Detscar. Moscow, 2010)
      This is a classy large-format pamphlet of 32 unnumbered pages, unusually tall: almost 11½ with a width of 7¾. It shows the recent improvement in quality of Russian publications. Its front cover offers a slick illustration ...
    • I.A. Krilov: Basni 

      Ivanovy, A; Ivanovy, O (Rosmen Press. MoscowMoskva, 2003)
      I find fifty-four fables here on one-hundred-and-twenty pages. The illustrations are done in a very attractive style. The book sustains an unusual individual format for its fables, with text on the left and illustration(s) ...
    • I.A. Krilov: Basni (Russian) 

      Krylov, Ivan Andreevich (Gerion. Saint PetersburgSankt-Peterburg, 2003)
      This lovely little (4½ x 6½) book contains nineteen fables with delightful colored pictures. Its cover already gives the keynote: the bass-playing bear explains with hand outstretched to the three fellow members of the ...
    • Slon I Mos'ka (Russian: Elephant and Pug-Dog) 

      Krylov, Ivan Andreevich (Publishing House 000 (Rus'). Moscow, 2003)
      This pamphlet opens with a surprise when we see an elephant marching among cars down a contemporary street. The next illustration underscores the contemporaneity of the scene when we see one man on the street in an Amstel ...
    • Strekoza I Muravey (Russian: Grasshopper and Ant) 

      No Author (Publishing House 000 (Rus')Rusʹ. MoscowSmolensk, 2003)
      This pamphlet does a strong job of anthropomorphizing the two main characters. The grasshopper has huge eyes. Is that some sort of beetle warning her among the brown leaves in the fall? The winter scene seems to present ...
    • Vorona I Lisitsa (Russian: Fox and Crow) 

      Krylov, Ivan Andreevich (Publishing House 000 (Rus'). Moscow, 2003)
      This art in this sixteen-page pamphlet is heavy on color and anthropomorphic animals. Perhaps the strongest illustration is that hear the end which shows the crow surrounded by the outline of a royal figure, including a ...