Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBaumann, D. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBottomley, William K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-28T20:31:53Z
dc.date.available2016-11-28T20:31:53Z
dc.date.issued1953en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/106900
dc.description.abstractIn all branches of chemistry ozone has been found to be of considerable value. The addition of ozone to the ethylenic double bond, followed by reduction and the decomposition of the resulting ozonides, has been described (3) as the most general and reliable procedure for oxidative cleavage with simultaneous location of the double bond. The inorganic chemist has studied the action of ozone on various solvents (14) and on alkali metals, ammonia, and substituted ammonias (15). The biological chemist has employed ozone in small concentrations as a disinfectant, and industrial engineers have labored to combat its toxicity concentrations (9). |Although ozone was discovered as early as 1785, its usefulness has been realized only within the last forty- five years. In spite of Its relatively unknown uses and possibilities in the chemical field to the average person, most of them have experienced Its presence without knowing it. Ozone occurs in the vicinity of electrical field transformers and transmitters, or any region of an electrical discharge in air. It is detectable after an electrical storm because its presence gives the air a|fresh odor. |Previous laboratory ozonizers have been constructed using varying amounts of secondary voltages, soft and pyrex glass tubing, different amounts of surface area over which the oxygen passes, various conducting mediums and electrodes, and some have made the conversion from pure oxygen while others have used air as the source of oxygen. Every ozonizer is slightly different from all others in construction as well as in percent conversion. The purpose of this investigation was to construct an ozonizer and to calibrate the percent conversion of oxygen to ozone.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleConstruction and Calibration of a Laboratory Ozonizeren_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorBottomley, William K.en_US
dc.degree.levelMS (Master of Science)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineChemistry (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.S. in Chemistryen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record