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dc.contributor.advisorKennedy, Leo R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEkfelt, Vernon Henryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-29T19:23:25Z
dc.date.available2016-11-29T19:23:25Z
dc.date.issued1951en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/106904
dc.description.abstractIt has been the belief of many people, including coaches, that participation in athletics develops the skeletal muscles and stimulates growth of young boys. It has been widely accepted that the muscles that were used in athletics would grow larger and stronger than they would have had they not been used in athletics. As a result the athlete would be better able to cope with the stresses and strains that ordinary living places upon the individual. There has even been some lamenting the fact that youth has been growing "soft" because of insufficient amounts of "rugged" athletics. It was also generally held that some forms of athletics stimulated muscle and body growth to a greater degree than other forms. It was the purpose of this study to gather some concrete evidence as to whether or not these rather common beliefs were true. The plan was to measure boys who engaged in two forms of high school athletics and compare these measurements with those of boys who did not participate in athletics.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.titleMeasurement and Comparison of Physical Growth of High School Boys in Several Activitiesen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorEkfelt, Vernon Henryen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEducation (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Educationen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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