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dc.contributor.authorNabity, Carolineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T17:20:27Z
dc.date.available2017-01-05T17:20:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/108322
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|“Recognizing that at all periods of history genocide has inflicted great losses on humanity, and being convinced that, in order to liberate mankind from such an odious scourge, international co-operation is required. . . .” Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, Dec. 9, 1948, 78 U.N.T.S. 277. |In March of 2016, the United States’ Secretary of State, John Kerry, declared crimes being committed by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (‘ISIS’) in Iraq and Syria against minorities were genocide. The big question now is, what are the obligations of the U.S. to stop the genocide from continuing? This article sets out to answer the question of what obligations, under the International Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (the ‘Genocide Convention’), does the U.S. have to prevent and to punish the genocide taking place in Syria and Iraq at the hands of ISIS? Under the Genocide Convention the U.S. has an obligation to prevent and to punish the genocide taking place in Syria and Iraq at the hands of ISIS. However, the convention provides no mandatory mechanism to effectuate these obligations, leaving it up to the U.S. to decide what actions to take next|This article analyzes the obligations of the U.S as a signatory of the Genocide Convention to take action against ISIS now that the U.S. has deemed ISIS’ actions genocide. First, the article will provide background into the issue looking at ISIS, ISIS’s acts, and the obligations under the Genocide Convention that bind member states. Second, the obligations under the Genocide Convention will be applied to the situation occurring in Iraq and Syria by looking at the legal obligations that arise under the Genocide Convention and how the U.S. reacted in other situations to genocide. The article concludes by looking at the next steps for the U.S. in dealing with the genocidal acts occurring in Iraq and Syria. The conclusion, details the results inaction will have on the Genocide Convention.en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.rightsCopyrighten_US
dc.subject.otherSchool of Lawen_US
dc.subject.otherMagazineen_US
dc.titleIt’s Genocide, Now What: The Obligations of the United States Under the Convention To Prevent and Punish Genocide Being Committed at the Hands of ISISen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume8en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton International and Comparative Law Journalen_US
dc.description.pages70-90en_US
dc.date.year2017en_US
dc.description.issue1en_US
dc.program.unitCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorNabity, Carolineen_US


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