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dc.contributor.advisorHorning, Ross C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Richard F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-10T20:21:33Z
dc.date.available2017-04-10T20:21:33Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/111719
dc.description.abstractIn a democracy, public opinion shapes policies or at least influences them. American public opinion is shaped by the conditions in which Americans live. Americans have always been sympathetic toward revolutions in countries where democracy, as they understand it, is not present. This often precludes a clear understanding of events by the public and the leaders of American government. Was this true in 1956 when the Hungarian people revolted against the established regime in Hungary? If Americans understood the events in Hungary in the fall of 1956, were the policies of the American government consistent with the opinion of the American people toward Hungary? These are a few of the questions with which this paper will be concerned.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States--Historyen_US
dc.titleAmerica Looks at the Hungarian Revolutionen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorMyers, Richard F.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistory (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Historyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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