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dc.contributor.advisorKuhlman, Thomas A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Steven G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-21T15:05:52Z
dc.date.available2017-04-21T15:05:52Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/111796
dc.description.abstractEdith Sitwell uses color symbolism throughout her entire canon of work, both in her poetry and in her prose. Her color imagery can range from the traditional red rose, which appears as a powerful symbol of life in her war poetry, to the esoteric "Emily-colored primulas" of Spring, an early poem in the Bucolic Comedies. It was often necessary for Dame Edith to explain her color symbolism because of its individual nature. Her explanation that "Emily is a countrified old fashioned name, and pink primulas remind one of . . . country girls" was essential to an understanding of the meaning of the poem in which that symbol appeared. In the view of Dame Edith, few things could be more clear than her use of color. By the time she writes her great war poetry, however, much refinement of the poetic skill had occurred and the color symbols in those poems are, though multi-level, not of the same hidden quality as the early attempts at color used for increased meaning.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.subjectWorld War IIen_US
dc.titleThe Significance of Color in Six War Poems of Edith Sitwellen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorRussell, Steven G.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Englishen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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