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dc.contributor.advisorKuhlman, Thomas A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Susan Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T22:07:43Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T22:07:43Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/111829
dc.description.abstractIn his first novel This Side of Paradise, Fitzgerald plants and cultivates a theory about the hero's relation to his own character and his society. This and subsequent novels prove that, in Fitzgerald's view, society should both inspire the hero and produce occasions for him to act admirably and helpfully. Simultaneously, his heroes must reconcile their need to be needed with their need to be loved. Insofar as the hero aims exclusively at being loved, admired, and pleasing he will be a failure. Ideally, if the hero does work creatively and does meet the needs of others, as opposed to merely pleasing others, his life and character become relatively safe from his own weaknesses and from the pitfalls in society. Whether Fitzgerald found a tenable way for his twentieth century men to reconcile their ambitions with their society is the question this study will answer.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titlePersonality and Personage: Scott Fitzgerald's Heroes from this Side of Paradise to Tender is the Nighten_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorWest, Susan Aliceen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Englishen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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