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dc.contributor.advisorLaughlin, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorDauble, Kathrynen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-08T00:15:58Z
dc.date.available2018-05-13T08:40:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/112895
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Historically febrile illnesses have their highest incidence in early childhood. Yet research has shown there is a profound misunderstanding among caregivers concerning fever in young children which can lead to increased caregiver anxiety, over utilization of emergency services and home treatment errors (Wallenstein et al., 2012).|Methods: A voluntary 10-question written survey was administered to the caregivers of children age 0-8 years that were brought to a rural family primary care clinic. The survey assessed basic knowledge and management of fever in young children.|Results: Results found that overall caregivers had a good basic knowledge on fever but were unsure of antipyretic dosing, home care management and when emergency care was needed.|Discussion: Understanding caregivers' fear and assessing knowledge and perceptions of fever leads to better patient/provider communication and improved care for febrile children.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshFeveren_US
dc.titleFever Phobia: Educating caregivers in the primary care settingen_US
dc.rights.holderKathryn Daubleen_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.embargo.terms2018-05-13
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeConnelly, Susanen_US
dc.degree.committeeFultz, Jannaen_US
dc.degree.committeeDuffy, Micheleen_US


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