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dc.contributor.authorWirth, Eileenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-30T19:04:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-30T19:04:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-25en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 58en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/113256
dc.description.abstract"And behold I am with you always, until the end of the age." - Matthew 28|In my mind's eye, I imagine myself stumbling across a small group of men and their leader on a mountain in Galilee 2,000 years ago.|The men were tough and no-nonsense working fellows who obviously didn't spend their days reading scrolls in the Temple. They were publicly worshiping God and their leader but I overhead them arguing until their leader spoke.|"Go therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you," he said. "And behold, I am with you always until the end of the age."|With that, he disappeared, seemingly up to heaven. But what did he mean? I was confused but even more fascinated. Most of the men looked dumbfounded, staring into the sky. A few started weeping. Some just stood there until they slowly started walking down the mountain.|I followed them at a respectful distance, trying to make sense out of what I had just witnessed, hoping to learn more about their leader. Somehow I knew my life had changed. The leader was gone but I still felt his presence.|As I contemplate this scene, I ponder what the Ascension means to us today. It seems to simultaneously celebrate loss and hope – the loss of Jesus on earth but the hope that he remains with us forever. Ironically, had the apostles not lost Jesus in the flesh, they likely would not have spread his spirit to the ends of the earth for generations to come.|The Ascension's intertwining message of loss and hope has always struck me as especially powerful because it coincides with the graduation season when so many people experience a bittersweet combination of moving on from the beloved familiar to a new life.|And just like the disciples, we're scared of facing the unknown. However Jesus' promise that "I am with you always, until the end of the age" resonates with us and reassures us. Like the apostles leaving that mountain, we can trust that Jesus will remain with us no matter where life takes us.|Blessings to all graduates and their families and to all who are experiencing transitions! May the Lord be with you and give you hope, strength and courage.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/112536
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.subject.otherAscension of the Lorden_US
dc.titleReflection for Thursday, May 25, 2017: Ascension of the Lord.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day25en_US
dc.date.year2017en_US
dc.date.monthMayen_US
dc.program.unitRetireden_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorWirth, Eileen M.en_US
dc.date.daynameThursdayen_US
dc.date.seasonEasteren_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 6en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace2.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/113249
dc.relation.previoushttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/113248
dc.subject.local1Acts 1:1-11en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 47:2-3, 6-7, 8-9en_US
dc.subject.local3Ephesians 1:17-23en_US
dc.subject.local4Matthew 28:16-20en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Aen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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