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dc.contributor.advisorWise, Kenith C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSlaven, Robert Knowles Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T22:01:55Z
dc.date.available2017-11-15T22:01:55Z
dc.date.issued1977en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/115014
dc.description.abstractThe nature of sea power has changed. The historic pre-eminence of the man of war as the visible tool of sea power is being eroded. The principal value of the sea as a highway for the transport of commerce and communication is being diluted as the value of the sea as a source of living (and non-living) resources increases. In the aggregate, the ability to use the sea has grown more important than the ability to command the sea. | Fishermen have been the precursors of national maritime greatness. This was the case of the 15th Century Portuguese, the 16th Century Dutch, the 17th Century English and the 18th Century Americans. The indications are that it is also the case with the 20th Century Russians. The Soviet Union, a traditional continental power, is aggressively extending the scope of its worldwide fishing effort. The increase in the Soviet Union's fishing capability has been remarkable. Between 1948 and 1976, the Soviet catch increased from 1.5 to 13 million metric tons of fish per year. Other nations are promoting major new investments in ships and training of crews for their deep sea fishing efforts. More ships from more countries are competing for the living resources of the sea. | Western sea power theory, however, does not recognize the implications of this competition. Indeed, whether or not the fishing fleet and fishermen even have a valid role in the calculation of national sea power may be an issue itself. At lease one observer has stated they do not.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleThe Fisheries and the Changing Nature of Sea Poweren_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSlaven, Robert Knowles Jr.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineInternational Relations (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in International Relationsen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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