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dc.contributor.advisorNo Advisor Listeden_US
dc.contributor.authorLynch, John G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T17:10:28Z
dc.date.available2018-01-05T17:10:28Z
dc.date.issued1975-04-18en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/115698
dc.description.abstractThe company selling to industrial markets faces much the same kind of pressure for product innovation as does the manufacturer serving consumer markets. Thus, producers of industrial goods are highly dependent on their development of new products for remaining competitive, for ensuring company growth, and for offsetting the effects of product obsolescence. | The problem that many executives fail to consider in launching a new-product venture is the prospect for economic success. This failure to make an economic evaluation of the product can be attributed to management's belief that an analysis is either too difficult to perform or that the methods used for quantitative analysis do not produce meaningful results. An investigation into this reasoning will frequently reveal that the decision maker does not fully comprehend the concepts involved in making an economic analysis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleEconomic Evaluation of New Product Proposalsen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorLynch, John G.en_US
dc.degree.levelMBA (Master of Business Administration)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineBusiness Administration (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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