Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMiller, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-12T22:04:54Z
dc.date.available2018-02-12T22:04:54Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn1941-8450en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/116864
dc.description.abstractEvidence from Earth system science suggests that we have forced the earth system out of the relatively stable conditions of the Holocene into a new geological epic. Among the implications of this evidence is that human beings have become a geological force whose influence will be detected thousands to millions of years from now. Our social and cultural imagination, however, has become reduced more and more to the present. This paper develops theological foundations through systematic and philosophical theology, in dialogue with the natural sciences, for opening our imaginations to the deep future so that we can grasp our responsibility for the effects of our actions that will extend for thousands to millions of years. As such it will offer theological foundations for an ethic of the deep future.|Keywords: Anthropocene, climate change, environmental ethics, Christian theology, futureen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleThe Christian Imagination and the Anthropoceneen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume16en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workSupplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Societyen_US
dc.description.noteReligion and Globalizationen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorMiller, Richard


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record