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dc.contributor.advisorRubarth, Lori B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDelCore, Laurianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRubarth, Lorien_US
dc.contributor.authorWallingford, Brendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-11T13:08:39Z
dc.date.available2019-05-12T08:40:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/117887
dc.description.abstractProblem: Breastfeeding duration is not meeting national goals according to the CDC (82%).|Background: Breastfeeding has many benefits for a baby's health and development as well as for the mother and the bonding between them. There are many reasons a mother may decide to not breastfeed or to stop breastfeeding when the infant is under the recommended age. One of these reasons is the support from the father, which plays a large role in how long a mother may choose to breastfeed. There are many ways a father can be involved and supportive of the mother.|Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement an educational program to increase support from the father for maternal breastfeeding, therefore, increasing the time that mothers continue to breastfeed.|Methods: Fathers and breastfeeding mothers (n=18) were included in this pilot educational program at a Level III NICU. Fathers were given education on how they could support the breastfeeding mother and then prior to discharge were given the Parent Participation Tool (PPT) to complete. The PPT is a 17-item Likert scale survey with ratings from 1-5. The mothers were asked to fill out the Postpartum Partner Support Survey (PPSS) prior to discharge. The PPSS is a 25-item Likert scale survey with ratings from 1-4.|Results: Infants were from 28-41 weeks gestation. PPT overall score = 4.76 (mean). PPSS overall score = 3.59 (mean). Fathers felt comfortable supporting the mother while she breastfeeds = 4.89 (mean). Babies discharge receiving human milk = 80% overall.|Conclusions: Overall, fathers were satisfied with their level of participation in their NICU baby's care. Overall, mothers were satisfied with the support they received from their spouse. Positive comments were received from the fathers who participated. Breastfeeding rates at discharge are increasing, but not to the 82% level.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen_US
dc.subject.meshFathersen_US
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care, Neonatalen_US
dc.titlePaternal Involvement and Breastfeeding Supporten_US
dc.rights.holderLauriana DelCore is the person owning copyright in the project document.en_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.embargo.terms2019-05-12
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeWallingford, Brendaen_US
dc.degree.committeeMyers, Donnaen_US


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