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dc.contributor.authorCarney, Jayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-30T20:04:34Z
dc.date.available2018-05-30T20:04:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 351en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/118261
dc.description.abstractWhat does it mean to follow Jesus? This question of discipleship first animated my desire to study theology, and it continues to animate my research and teaching. I would argue that it also animates today's readings.|So what do we learn about Christian discipleship in today's Scriptures? For Peter, "the end of all things is at hand." These are dangerous words! Yet the expectation of Christ's Parousia does not lead to apocalyptic craziness here in the early 2nd century. If anything, it seems to focus the mind, heart, and soul on core traits of Christian discipleship: we are called to be sober-minded, hospitable, joyful, and above all intense in our self-giving love for one another. This is a good blueprint for any day of my life, whether Jesus returns tomorrow or two millennia from now.|Mark's gospel was written for disciples, and Mark's Jesus so often embodies the gospel in action (and if necessary uses words). Yet today's "action hero Jesus" is not the laughing Jesus of so many church basements, or the triumphant Risen Christ of so many church sanctuaries. This is the hungry Jesus who can't be satiated. This is the angry Jesus who attacked the political economy of the Temple, likely sealing his ultimate fate on the Cross. This is the restless Jesus who reminds us of the "cost of discipleship," to echo Dietrich Bonhoeffer's famous words. We need this Jesus to push us out of our comfort zones, especially those of us who are not suffering for our faith like the disciples in 1 Peter or today's saint, Justin Martyr.   |And yet it's easy to lose sight of the final takeaways in today's gospel. We are not called to be action heroes but to be faithful followers. We are not called to do it ourselves but to trust in God. And we are not called to cast out but to forgive. May God help us to use this June to take one step forward on our path of discipleship.    en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/118231
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.subject.otherSt. Justin, Martyren_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, June 1, 2018: 8th Week of Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day1en_US
dc.date.year2018en_US
dc.date.monthJuneen_US
dc.program.unitTheologyen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorCarney, James Jayen_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 8en_US
dc.relation.nexthttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/118262
dc.relation.previoushttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/118260
dc.subject.local11 Peter 4:7-13en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 96:10, 11-12, 13en_US
dc.subject.local4Mark 11:11-26en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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