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dc.contributor.advisorRaynovich, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Kimberlyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T03:29:43Z
dc.date.available2018-07-31T03:29:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/118779
dc.description.abstractThis phenomenological qualitative study examined the lived experiences of eleven individuals, hailing from mid-level to large for-profit organizations, who experienced organizational bullying from a victim, observer, or leadership perspective. The primary data collection method utilized in this study was a single in-depth interview from a snowball sampling. The data were coded and analyzed in accordance to the research questions. Three major themes emerged out of the experiences shared by the participants: I) the greater the power distance, the more frequently supervisor-to-employee bullying occurred; II) the smaller the power distance the more frequently peer-to-peer and employee-to-supervisor/manager bullying occurred; III) work environments were seen as more frequently threatening or hostile when the participants perceived they had less power. The researcher analyzed the themes from the participants lived experiences through the lens of adaptive leadership. This study revealed that when there was an increase in perceived power distances, there was an increase in the frequency of top-down organizational bullying, and there was an increase in the frequency of peer-to-peer bullying as well as employee-to-manager bullying when there was the presence of a small perceived power distance. A conclusion to be drawn from these findings is that the more perceived power one feels they possess the more apt they are to exert their perceived power or defend the possession of their perceived power. When perceived-power-holders felt ineffectual or incompetent, they were more likely to disparage, harass, or otherwise bully their subordinate(s). Recommendations are offered for peer-to-peer, employee-to-manager, and manager-to-employee(s) relationships, and workplace cultural improvements and for further research possibilities. Because there are unique dynamics that contribute to organizational bullying, the recommendations should be considered and applied on an individual organizational basis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleThe Role of Power Paradigms in Organizational Bullyingen_US
dc.typeDissertation
dc.rights.holderKimberly Dolanen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorDolan, Kimberlyen_US
dc.degree.levelEdD (Doctor of Education)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Ed.D. Program in Leadershipen_US
dc.degree.nameEd.D. Program in Leadershipen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US
dc.degree.committeeHawkins, Peggyen_US


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