Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T16:59:57Z
dc.date.available2018-12-17T16:59:57Z
dc.date.issued1914-01-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120716
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | Professor W.J. Humphreys, of the United States Weather Bureau, one of our leading meteorologists, has a very instructive article on "Holes in the Air" in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution for 1912. He begins it with the words: "The bucking and balking, the rearing, plunging, and other evidences of the mulish nature of the modern Pegasus soon inspired aerial jockeys to invent picturesque terms descriptive of their steeds and of the conditions under which their laurels were won or lost. One of the best of these expressions, one that is very generally used and seems to be a permanent acquisition, is "holes in the air." There are, of course, no holes in the ordinary sense of the term in the atmosphere—no vacuous regions—but the phrase "holes in the air" is brief and elegantly expressive of the fact that occasionally at various places in the atmosphere there are conditions which, so far as flying is concerned, are mighty like unto holes. Such conditions are indeed real, and it is the purpose of this paper to point out what some of them are, when and where they are most likely to occur and how best to avoid them."en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science January 20th 1914en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeVen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.description.pages259-262en_US
dc.description.issue4en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic5n4crei#page/258/mode/2up


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record