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dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T22:47:59Z
dc.date.available2018-12-17T22:47:59Z
dc.date.issued1916-02-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120723
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | A short time ago when the writer of these lines was A called to the telephone, a female voice inquired: "What are the signs of the zodiac going to be tomorrow ?" "What are the signs of the zodiac going to be tomorrow ?" I repeated in astonishment and in doubt as to what sense the questioner intended to give to the words, since to me they conveyed none as they were. "Yes," came the iterated query, "What are the signs of the zodiac going to be tomorrow?" I realized now that the voice did not know much about the zodiac. So I proceeded to condense their explanation into the fewest possible words. "The signs of the zodiac are twelve divisions in a belt around the heavens, which the sun runs once a year and the moon once a month, and which are carried round once a day by the turning of the heavens, so that we have all twelve of them in turn above us every day some time or other during the day or night. I do not therefore understand what you mean by your question." "Yes, you know what I mean," came the reply. "A lady friend of mine is to be operated on tomorrow—" "And you want to know if it will be a lucky day?" I tried to convince her in a few words of the foolishness of such notions. "Yes," she said, "I know, but I thought I would ask you for her sake."en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science February 20th 1916en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeVIIen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.description.pages240-246en_US
dc.description.issue5en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic7n5crei#page/240/mode/2up


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