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dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T16:23:32Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T16:23:32Z
dc.date.issued1916-12-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120726
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | The most remarkable eclipse in a certain way that can possibly occur, is the one that will come when we are busily preparing for Christmas, that is, when our clocks show 3 p.m. central time on Christmas eve. We in the United States will not even get a glimpse of it nor will any one in the whole of North and South America, nor in the wide extent of the Pacific Ocean. For us and for all these lands and seas the sun will be shining undimmed in its full splendor, as far as the weather and the season permit. But far away in the Antarctic Ocean, about half way between the Cape of Good Hope and the South Pole, over a limited tract of unfrequented waters, the sun will be eclipsed to such a tiny extent, a trifle over one per cent, that it seems to be a downright waste of time, if not absolute folly, to mention it at all. But for the ships that may be there to see it, the eclipse will occur when some of them have midnight, Christmas midnight, while others have any hour or minute on Christmas eve from 9:41 p.m. to midnight, and a few have already for a few minutes after midnight begun Christmas day.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.subjectEclipseen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science December 20th 1916en_US
dc.title.alternativeEclipse of the Christmas Midnight Sunen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeVIIIen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.title.workEclipse of the Christmas Midnight Sunen_US
dc.description.pages167-174en_US
dc.description.issue3en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic8n3crei#page/166/mode/2upen_US


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