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dc.contributor.authorRigge, William F., S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T16:53:50Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T16:53:50Z
dc.date.issued1917-04-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120728
dc.description.abstractFirst Paragraph: | It has often been said that no astronomer can be an atheist. The scale upon which the universe is built; the endless variety and the infinite number of the visible stars, all of which are self-luminous suns like our own ; the conviction that the heavens must be filled by a vastly greater number of invisible and dark bodies forever concealed from our sight and our knowledge; and above all, the wonderful order and harmony prevailing throughout the entire universe, and the utter helplessness and nothingness of man in the presence of these stupendous bodies : all these are like the voices of a great multitude and like the sound of many waters, proclaiming aloud in unmistakable tones that the heavens declare the glory of the Lord and that the universe is the work of His hands.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectRigge Papersen_US
dc.subjectThe Realm of Scienceen_US
dc.titleRealm of Science April 20th 1917en_US
dc.title.alternativeIs the Earth Falling Into the Sun?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.volumeVIIIen_US
dc.title.workThe Creighton Chronicleen_US
dc.description.pages460-469en_US
dc.description.issue7en_US
dc.url.link1https://archive.org/stream/creightonchronic8n7crei#page/460/mode/2up


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