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dc.contributor.advisorCassingham, R. Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorPlotzke, Anthony Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-09T19:36:23Z
dc.date.available2019-01-09T19:36:23Z
dc.date.issued1972en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/120923
dc.description.abstractThe destructive effect of cold on living tissues has been known for centuries. One of the earliest therapeutic applications of cold involved its anesthetic properties. Napoleon's surgeons amputated limbs painlessly on soldiers who had lain in the snow for some time. Researchers have long explored the potential therapeutic usefulness of cooling or freezing parts of the body to produce controlled physiologic inhibition, anatomic destruction, or anesthesia. | Cryogeny is the science of producing and using extreme cold. The prefix CRYO-derives from the Greek KRYMOS (icy cold). Cryosurgery, or the clinical use of freezing procedures, is distinct from the cold applications used to reduce fever or swelling and to alleviate pain. It also differs from the moderate reduction in temperature effected by hypothermia or refrigeration of the body or a limb for therapeutic or surgical procedures.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleA Histological Study of the Effects of Controlled Freezing on Human Gingival Tissueen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorPlotzke, Anthony Edwarden_US
dc.degree.levelMS (Master of Science)en_US
dc.degree.disciplinePeriodontology (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.S. in Periodontologyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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