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dc.contributor.authorBoesenberg, Dulcineaen_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSmith, Zachary B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-01T21:34:37Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01T21:34:37Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.issn1941-8450en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/121320
dc.description.abstractPaul’s quotation of the prophet Isaiah and subsequent announcement that he will proclaim the gospel to the Gentiles in the final verses of the Acts of the Apostles has been read as evidence that the mission to the Jews has come to an end. Against this interpretation, I argue that Paul’s words, when read in light of Paul’s prophetic rebuke of Jews in Acts 13:41 and Paul’s two earlier “turns” to the Gentiles (Acts 13:46; 18:6), function as part of his gospel proclamation to encourage reform. Just as Paul’s use of prophetic rebuke and turns to the Gentiles did not bring an end to the mission to the Jews in the course of the Acts narrative, neither do they end the Jewish mission in Acts 28.|Keywords: Paul, Acts, prophetic rebuke, mission to the Jews, use of scriptureen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleProphetic Rebuke in Acts: Calling for Reform Rather than Rejection of Israelen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume18en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workSupplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Societyen_US
dc.description.noteReligion and Reformen_US


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