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dc.contributor.authorWaldman, Feliciaen_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorRoddy, Nicolaeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-12T22:17:24Z
dc.date.available2019-04-12T22:17:24Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.citationWaldman, F. (2019). Expected and Unexpected Authorship of Religious Elements in Late Nineteenth, Early Twentieth Century Bucharest Architecture. Supplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Society Supplement Series, 19, 38-50.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1941-8450en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/122268
dc.description.abstractThe hodge-podge architectural heritage is among Bucharest’s most unique attractions, a result of the multicultural background of those who contributed to its modernization. In this respect, a paramount role was played by Jewish and Armenian architects, who designed emblematic buildings that still constitute today landmarks of the Romanian capital, but also businessmen who commissioned private mansions and public utility edifices (hotels, restaurants, hospitals, etc.) that transformed the city. From the nineteenth century onwards, and particularly in the interwar period, Bucharest was a crossroad of civilizations, where East met West, and various ethnic and religious groups coexisted. The best exemplification of this outstanding circumstance is the fact that during this time Christian architects designed not only churches, as one would expect, but also synagogues; while Jewish craftsmen decorated not only synagogues, but also churches. Moreover, Jewish businessmen commissioned Armenian architects to design their houses and decorate them with Armenian religious symbols. The article brings to light several of the more interesting cases, demonstrating the complexity of religious presence in Bucharest’s architectural legacy.|Keywords: religion, churches, synagogues, identity, architecture, heritage, Bucharest, Jewish history, Armenian historyen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleExpected and Unexpected Authorship of Religious Elements in Late Nineteenth, Early Twentieth Century Bucharest Architectureen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume19en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workSupplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Societyen_US
dc.description.noteReligious History and Culture of the Balkansen_US
dc.description.pages38-50en_US


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