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dc.contributor.authorCraven, Lacey
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-17T17:46:30Z
dc.date.available2019-06-17T17:46:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier10.17062/cjil.v5i1.83en_US
dc.identifier.issn2379-9307en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/123051
dc.description.abstractIn Rules for a Flat World, Hadfield focuses on law as created by and comprised of primarily centralized legal institutions. Current insights into law, however, highlight a complexity behind the social movements that cause disruption and lead to real legal change, which creates a new, broader definition of law. Taking Hadfield’s view that law needs to be understood and designed by economists, policymakers, entrepreneurs, business leaders and ordinary people, not just lawyers (Hadfield, 2017), a little further, this paper considers the complexity of social movements in combination with law as part of a more robust definition of law.en_US
dc.languageen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2019 Creighton Journal of Interdisciplinary Leadershipen_US
dc.titleIt’s All Relative: Social Movements and Lawen_US
dc.description.volume5en_US
dc.title.workCreighton Journal of Interdisciplinary Leadershipen_US
dc.description.pages38-44en_US
dc.description.issue1en_US
dc.url.link1http://doi.org/10.17062/cjil.v5i1.83en_US


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