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dc.contributor.authorEllis, James W.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T15:25:31Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T15:25:31Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/124379
dc.description.abstractThis essay analyses masterpieces of Hudson River School landscape painting within relevant religious, artistic, and literary contexts. The Hudson River School, America’s first indigenous art movement, included Thomas Cole, Asher Brown Durand, Frederic Edwin Church, and George Inness. The essay rediscovers significant spiritual meaning within recurring visual motifs, specifically tree arches and rib vaults, and forest cathedrals. The motifs illustrate themes that captured the imagination of nineteenth-century America, the sublime wilderness and divine nature. Viewing these major landscape paintings from wider perspectives contributes to critical religious and socio-cultural discourses.|Keywords: Hudson River School, landscape painting, pointed arch, sublime wilderness, divine natureen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleForest Cathedrals: “The Hidden Glory” of Hudson River Landscapesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume21en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workJournal of Religion & Societyen_US


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