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dc.contributor.authorLutz, Oliviaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T22:21:56Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T22:21:56Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/128735
dc.description.abstractOpening Paragraph|In our current society, the media serves as one of the primary sources for information that fuels arguments surrounding the deep political divides that have become characteristic of politics in the United States. This stream of information is increasingly available to the public, especially with modern technology and the increased usage of social media. G. William Domhoff's writings on the influence and economic power of the power elite theorize that our media sources are subject to influence from power elites. This study explores the extent to which these elite political ideologies are present in media sources. Drawing on evidence collected through an analysis of the boards of directors for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, this paper argues that the political ideologies of the power elite associated with media corporations are not always consistent with the overall political ideologies expressed by the respective media corporations' opinion and editorial publications.en_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis material is copyrighteden_US
dc.titleRepresentation of Elite Political Ideologies in Media Sourcesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.description.volume8en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workQuest: A Journal of Undergraduate Student Researchen_US
dc.description.pages206-221en_US
dc.date.year2020en_US
dc.description.issue1en_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorLutz, Oliviaen_US


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  • QUEST
    A Journal of Undergraduate Student Research

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