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dc.contributor.authorLegatski, Emily
dc.contributor.authorSynek, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-02T12:31:16Z
dc.date.available2021-05-02T12:31:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/130345
dc.description.abstractCerebral palsy (CP) is a common neuromotor disorder that occurs in 1.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Children with CP live with a variety of symptoms including spasticity, abnormal tone, poor reflex integration, movement rigidity, coordination difficulties, and postural instabilities. These children often have difficulties completing activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) including bathing, dressing, self-care, and feeding. The purpose of this analysis was to critically appraise various types and levels of UE interventions for children aged 0-18 years old with CP to determine which interventions are most effective in improving functional ADL and IADL outcomes. The analysis showed that a combination of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and HABIT training were the most effective at improving functional outcomes for children with CP. Other interventions such as modified CIMT, forced-use training, and MITTI lacked evidence to support utilizing them in treatment. All interventions require further investigation regarding the time commitment and specific protocols necessary to make the interventions successful.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.titleWhat is the effectiveness of upper extremity training interventions on increasing participation in ADL and IADL engagement for children aged 0-18 years old with cerebral palsy (CP)?en_US
dc.rights.holderLegatski, Emily
dc.rights.holderSynek, Sarah


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