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dc.contributor.authorSvoboda, Allison
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-02T23:04:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-02T23:04:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/130354
dc.description.abstractThe researchers of the previous study demonstrated clinical significance by utilizing a valid and reliable measure to identify dysfunctions prior to treatment and improvements following the session. The measure the researchers utilized was the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale 2nd version (PDMS-2) which identified six subtests to analyze pre and post treatment. The categories that were evaluated were stationary, locomotion, object manipulation, grasping, and visual motor integration. The significance that the research established in relation to clinical occupational therapy practice is that when treatment sessions exhibit Ayers Sensory Integration (ASI) theory, there is a positive increase in motor skill development. Occupational therapists can utilize ASI in treatment with individuals who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to enhance motor proficiencies in activities of daily living. ASI is best utilized as an intensive outpatient therapy due to the specific protocols, locations, and methodologies applied. Societal implications for enhancing interventions for individuals with ASD is due to the current cost of approximately 35 billion dollars due to medical and non-medical responsibilities (Ganz, 2007). Furthermore, the strategies established through ASI could help alleviate some of these costs due to the increase in occupational performance and overall independence. The current researchers examined the effectiveness of Ayers Sensory Integration theory on improving occupational participation in children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. The researchers critically analyzed 5 articles that were either a randomized control trial or pre/posttest. Both randomized and non-randomized studies were utilized to determine the impact of treatment compared to the baseline of the participants. Identifying the baseline of the participant replicates clients/patients coming into treatment for an evaluation and a discharge. Therefore, it is advantageous to utilize pre/posttest when analyzing outcome measures with intervention strategies. The CAT consisted of 3 level I articles, 1 level II, and 1 level III. The researchers found that there are benefits to occupational therapy (OT) through the clinical and community-based practice of OT, program development, societal needs, healthcare delivery and health policy, education and training of OT students, and refinement, revision, and advancement of factual knowledge or theory. Furthermore, further level I RCT research should be established to promote, advocate, and provide intervention strategies and policy adaptations to decrease overall cost of ASD and to enhance occupational performance.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.titleWhat is the effectiveness of (Ayers) Sensory Integration theory on improving occupational participation in children with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder?en_US
dc.rights.holderAllison, Jessica
dc.rights.holderSvoboda, Allison


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