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dc.contributor.advisorSchwartz, Misty
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Monika
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-03T01:05:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/130358
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this DNP project was to address the knowledge deficit of allergy-related pathophysiology, treatment options, risks, and benefits of Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT), methods to minimize AIT related systemic reactions (SRs), and to improve consistency in providing AIT using evidence-based practice processes among healthcare professionals across all levels of training.|Background: Even though the rate of AIT-related systemic reactions is relatively low at 0.1-0.2% annually, AIT continues to pose a threat of SRs, anaphylaxis, and death. Compounding the concern that the rate of fatal reactions has remained unchanged for the past 40 years, research has shown a knowledge deficit of allergy-related content among healthcare professionals (HCP).|Sample/Setting: This project's target population is Creighton University graduate students training to become primary care HCP's and associated Creighton University staff.|Methods: An online 1-hour Continuing Education Unit (CEU) module consisting of 24 educational slides and a pre-injection screening tool was designed. The slides included multiple modes of learning, including content presentations, quizzes, and video clips. A pre-test/post-test design was used to evaluate change in knowledge. Participant opinion of sustainability of the knowledge gained, relevance to practice, and sustained use of the pre-screening tool was evaluated in the end of course survey. An allergy content expert evaluated the module for accuracy and assisted in course refinement before the course was published.|Results: A paired t-test was conducted to evaluate the impact of the educational module on the 16 participants’ knowledge based on their pre-and post-test scores. There was a statistically significant increase in scores from the pretest (M = 69.3, SD 1.26) and the posttest (M = 90.7, SD 1.03), t= -4.335, p>.001 (2 tailed). The mean increase in post-test scores was 20.4 with a 95% confidence interval. Wilcoxon and McNemar tests revealed three questions showing statistically significant differences between pre-test and post-test: questions 2, 7, and 8 were examined and question #7 and question #8 were reviewed for revision and verification that content was covered in the presentation.|Conclusion: This allergy-related education module increased the knowledge gained scores among all reviewers. There was variability relating to whether reviewers planned to use the pre-injection screening tool and anaphylaxis office card in their practice. Survey responses indicated that sustainability is limited since some reviewers see a limited number of allergy patients. This project confirms that online education modules are a means of increasing provider knowledge to improve patient outcomes.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshDesensitization, Immunologicen_US
dc.subject.meshHypersensitivityen_US
dc.subject.meshRhinitis, Allergicen_US
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen_US
dc.titleAllergy: Assessment, Education, Screening, Implementation & Adherence to Current Clinical Guidelinesen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderBowen, Monika
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-05-14
dc.embargo.terms2022-05-14
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeCarrico, Cathy


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