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dc.contributor.authorWiernik, Craigen_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T21:51:36Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T21:51:36Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/130819
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the association between an individual’s religiosity and social trust. Using The Baylor Religion Survey I examine two general models of an individual’s religiosity and how religiosity influences social trust. As social trust is both moral and experiential, religion provides a moral foundation on which trust is built, and that trust is reinforced through behaviors and activities, both religious and secular. Religiosity should then impact trust through both the beliefs which create that moral foundations of trust, and the actions taken to maintain it. Ultimately, I find that one’s religiosity is best modeled as a single construct to predict social trust, and that the more religious one is, the higher their levels of social trust. Contrary to existing research, when examined as separate from religious participation, religious beliefs are not associated with social trust, but religious commitment is.|Keywords: religiosity, social trust, lived religion, religious beliefs, religious commitmenten_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleIndividual Religiosity and Social Trust in the U.S., 2004en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume23en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workJournal of Religion & Societyen_US


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