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dc.contributor.authorBoaz, Danielle N.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T21:54:46Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T21:54:46Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/130820
dc.description.abstractSince the start of the 21st century, Brazil has been experiencing a rapidly escalating problem with Evangelical Christian extremism. Persons referring to themselves as “armies of Jesus” have been assaulting devotees of Afro-Brazilian religions—stealing and destroying their sacred artifacts, as well as burning and bombing their places of worship. Although Brazil recently passed some of the most expansive anti-terrorism legislation in the world, it has failed to hold Evangelical extremists accountable under these laws. This article explores how Brazil’s non-recognition of Evangelical extremism is part of a global trend to “exoticize” terrorists as a foreign, unfamiliar threat.|Keywords: terrorism, extremism, Brazil, Evangelical, Candombléen_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleExoticizing Terrorism: Religious Bias and the Unchecked Threat of Evangelical Christian Extremism in Brazilen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume23en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workJournal of Religion & Societyen_US


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