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dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Gerard P. Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T20:37:52Z
dc.date.available2013-01-28T20:37:52Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.citation1 Creighton L. Rev. 109 (1968)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/38348
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|A basic dislike for applying statutes retroactively is evident throughout history. The Roman Code states the principle that laws should only apply to actions in the future unless it is expressly stated that they should apply also to actions of the past. Such has generally been the rule in Rome, the Greek City States, and the English Common Law. In framing our American Constitution, a specific provision was made to prohibit punishment for acts committed prior to the enactment of a penal statute. Statutes violating this provision were commonly called ex post facto laws. Legislators and judges alike did not consider it ethical to attach to an already completed transaction a legal significance different from that which was the rule at the time of the transaction...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleRetroactivity and the Long Arm Statutesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume1en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1968en_US
dc.description.pages109-119en_US


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