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dc.contributor.authorLeu, C. Dennisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-11T21:25:27Z
dc.date.available2013-02-11T21:25:27Z
dc.date.issued1970en_US
dc.identifier.citation3 Creighton L. Rev. 135 (1969-1970)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/38637
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The illegitimate has long occupied a disfavored position in the law. In virtually every area of our jurisprudence in which the illegitimate has attempted to assert rights, he has been met with either legislation or court decision which have given him, at best, an inferior legal status. Whether the legal interest advanced has been in the area of child support, wrongful death, inheritance, workmen's compensation, public housing, custody and visitation, or legal name, the illegitimate has consistently been denied rights perfunctorily accorded the legitimate child. Although such denials have been justified as being required by the dictates of history and paramount state interest, the underlying foundation would appear to be a judicial and legislative reluctance to place the imprimatur of legal sanction upon the product of a relationship which both the law and traditional morality condemns...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleExpanding Rights of the Illegitimate, Theen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume3en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1969-1970en_US
dc.description.pages135en_US


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