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dc.contributor.authorJanney, Richard N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-12T16:54:07Z
dc.date.available2013-02-12T16:54:07Z
dc.date.issued1972en_US
dc.identifier.citation5 Creighton L. Rev. 98 (1971-1972)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/38693
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The constitution of the State of Nebraska provides in part: "Any city having a population of more than five thousand (5,000) inhabitants may frame a charter for its own government, consistent with and subject to the constitution and laws of this state... which charter... shall... become the charter of said city, and supersede any existing charter and all amendments thereof." It is further stated that "(n)o charter or charter amendment adopted under the provisions of this amendment shall be amended or repealed except by electoral vote." This provision authorizes certain cities to adopt what is ordinarily called a "home rule charter." It may be helpful in understanding this concept to discuss at the outset the purpose and meaning of "home rule." The use of "home rule," in the nebulous sense as a political symbol...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleHome Rule Charters in Nebraskaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume5en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1971-1972en_US
dc.description.pages98en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorFiroz, Muhammaden_US


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