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dc.contributor.authorMangrum, Richard Collinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T03:22:46Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T03:22:46Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citation15 Creighton L. Rev. 25 (1981-1982)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39318
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Child custody law has evolved from a rule of patriapotestas which vested near absolute authority over the custody and control of children in the father, to a best interests rule defended primarily by the power of the state as parenspatriae. The doctrine of parens patriae,as applied to child custody disputes, has been invoked by courts and legislatures to justify state intervention against whatever rights parents may have over the care and control of their children. In interfering with parental control over children, questions concerning the constitutional and moral limits to the state's power have often gone unanswered if not unasked. Resolution of this question is critical, especially since the number of custody cases is increasing dramatically. Between 1956 and 1976 the number of children involved in divorce proceedings rose from 361,000 to 100,000...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleExclusive Reliance on Best Interest May Be Unconstitutional: Religion as a Factor in Child Custody Casesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume15en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1981-1982en_US
dc.description.pages25en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorMangrum, Richard Collinen_US


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