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dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, William L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T03:23:08Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T03:23:08Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citation15 Creighton L. Rev. 803 (1981-1982)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39364
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Since the enactment of the Statute of 13 Elizabeth in 1570, the underlying premise of Anglo-American law of fraudulent conveyances has remained unchanged. Refusing to condone any deceitful transfer, the Statute stated: "[transfers] to the end, purpose and intent, to delay, hinder or defraud creditors ... of their just and lawful debts" are "clearly and utterly void, frustrate and of none effect. The United States Congress recognized the influence of this medieval statute when it amended the fraudulent conveyance section of the Bankruptcy Act in 1978...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleBankruptcyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume15en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1981-1982en_US
dc.description.pages803en_US


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