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dc.contributor.authorEkeler, Kathryn A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T03:23:11Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T03:23:11Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citation15 Creighton L. Rev. 911 (1981-1982)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39370
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The fourth amendment to the United States Constitution protects an individual from unreasonable searches and seizures by government officials; warrantless searches are per se unreasonable in the absence of specially provided exceptions. This article will discuss the extent to which government officials may use deception to gain access to private premises, and the parameters of the plain view doctrine.|In United States v. Wright, the Eighth Circuit decided that officers gaining entrance through deception and then utilizing the plain view doctrine as a basis for a search warrant did not violate the fourth amendment. The Eighth Circuit concluded that the investigating officers did not conduct an unconstitutional search when they employed minimal ruse, and their seizure of a shotgun was not the result of a general exploratory search beyond the scope of a valid search warrant. This article will explore the issues involved in determining when governmental deception employed in a search and seizure situation is so significant as to violate the fourth amendment...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleCriminal Procedure (Part I)en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume15en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1981-1982en_US
dc.description.pages911en_US


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