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dc.contributor.authorPorter, Karen Meyeren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T18:51:28Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T18:51:28Z
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.identifier.citation16 Creighton L. Rev. 487 (1982-1983)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39432
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The attorney who is confronted with client perjury faces legal and ethical dangers. The client's crime may expose the attorney to criminal charges of subornation. Even where the attorney's participation falls short of criminal jeopardy, the attorney encounters an ethical dilemma arising from the conflict between duty to client and duty to court. The professional standards of conduct do not provide any clear and consistent guidelines for the attorney to follow. Case law is divided on the subject, especially when the perjury occurs in the course of a criminal trial.|This comment analyzes two civil and two criminal cases addressing client perjury where the problem is treated in four distinct ways. Discussions of the professional standards of conduct and of constitutional repercussions are interwoven with the analysis of these cases. The comment reviews the current professional standards of conduct-which fail to resolve the perjury problem and examines the conflict between the professional standards and constitutional considerations...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleLying Clients and Legal Ethics: The Attorney's Unsolved Dilemmaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume16en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1982-1983en_US
dc.description.pages487en_US


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