Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNoethe, Edward F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T20:14:51Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T20:14:51Z
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citation18 Creighton L. Rev. 429 (1984-1985)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39556
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|An accountant may be held liable for malpractice either in contract for the breach of his contractual duties or in tort for the breach of his general duty to exercise due care. Since an accountant may be liable in tort, an intriguing issue arises concerning the availability of the defense of contributory negligence. In the limited cases in which the defense has been asserted, it has been proffered within either of two types of cases. First, the contributory negligence defense has been asserted when the accountant contends that the client's negligence in conducting its business allowed an employee's fraud or the inability to detect the employee's fraud. Second, the contributory defense has been asserted when the accountant contends that the client was contributorily negligent in conducting its business which resulted in a financial loss. In this type of case, the client contends that the accountant is liable for erroneously reporting its financial condition and that the client, as a result of relying on the accountant's erroneous advice, entered into a course of activity which resulted in a financial loss...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleAccountant's Liability - Contributory Negligence in Accountant Malpractice Actions after Lincoln Grain, Inc. v. Coopers (and) Lybranden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume18en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1984-1985en_US
dc.description.pages429en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorFiroz, Muhammaden_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record