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dc.contributor.authorKessell, Cheryl M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T20:14:53Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T20:14:53Z
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citation18 Creighton L. Rev. 449 (1984-1985)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39557
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The ability to remove children from the custody of their mothers and fathers is one of the most extreme forms of the states' power. From a legal perspective, [the parent-child] relationship is probably the least secure in the family constellation. Intersibling and interspousal relationships are immune from readjustment or termination by the state against the will of the household. However, fostered by the historical doctrine of parens patriae, the government has assumed an expanding role as a protector of children and, in order to shield them from harm, has established and enforced certain legal duties that parents owe to their children. When parents will not fulfill their obligations voluntarily by seeking help, the state either intervenes coercively or usurps their role. The parent-child relationship is not defenseless against state intrusion, however. The due process clause of the United States Constitution is the foundation for families' rights to autonomy and privacy from unnecessary state imposition...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleFamliy Law - Parental Rights in Emotional Abuse and Neglect Cases - In Re Interest of Hochstetleren_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume18en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1984-1985en_US
dc.description.pages449en_US


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