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dc.contributor.authorPearson, Ericen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T22:23:57Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T22:23:57Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citation23 Creighton L. Rev. 191 (1989-1990)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39809
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|On June 30, 1989, the Nebraska Supreme Court decided a zoning case entitled Giger v. City of Omaha, thereby putting an end to a process of negotiation and agreement among developers and city officials that had commenced almost seven years earlier. In Giger, the court reviewed an Omaha City Council decision to reclassify zoning for the Renstrom property in Omaha. The Renstrom property was an 84-acre tract of land in southwest Omaha bordered by the Big Papillion Creek on the southwest and by residential developments on two other sides. In Giger, the Midlands Development Company (Midlands) desired a rezoning classification to enable it to establish a mixed residential/commercial project known as One Pacific Place. Having already agreed to purchase the Renstrom property, Midlands entered into extensive negotiations to secure the zoning classification. Midlands negotiated four separate agreements with the city, collectively known as "The Development Agreement." This Development Agreement was incorporated into the new ordinance and triggered the passage of the ordinance itself...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleContract Zoning in Nebraska after Giger v. City of Omahaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume23en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1989-1990en_US
dc.description.pages191en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorPearson, Ericen_US


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