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dc.contributor.authorMascia, Patrick E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T22:24:03Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T22:24:03Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citation23 Creighton L. Rev. 441 (1989-1990)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39817
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|One of the biggest problems confronting the United States today is public education. Thomas Jefferson once hypothesized that democracy would fail if the population had a weak educational foundation; thus, the American way of life may be at risk. To keep strong our democratic tradition the forces of human ingenuity must remain alive. For this reason, education must "nurture, develop and encourage human intelligence."Today, public education is not achieving this goal. In many respects, American public schools are dismal failures that have been kept alive by compulsion. Because of the educational crisis, the United States has been put at a competitive disadvantage. The statistics tell the story: 700,000 functionally illiterate students graduatee very year and 700,000 more drop out of school. In addition, American high school seniors were recently ranked fourteenth out of fifteen industrialized countries in mathematics performance...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleOpen Enrollment: Social Darwinism at Worken_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume23en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1989-1990en_US
dc.description.pages441en_US


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