Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTracy, Thomas J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T16:04:11Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T16:04:11Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citation26 Creighton L. Rev. 1221 (1992-1993)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40020
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Throughout history, a person's reputation has been given the highest order of protection by society and its laws. The Bible commands us, "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor," and counsels that "[a] good name is rather to be chosen than great riches." William Shakespeare teaches us that a good name "is the immediate jewel of our souls. Who steals my purse steals trash.... But he that filches from me my good name robs me of that which not enriches him, and makes me poor indeed." In American jurisprudence, courts have recognized that a state has a legitimate interest in compensating individuals for the injuries received from defamatory falsehoods. At the same time, "our profound national commitment to the free exchange of ideas, as enshrined in the First Amendment, demands that the law of libel carve out an area of 'breathing space so that protected speech is not discouraged."...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleThou Shalt not Use His Name in Vain - The Misapplication of Milkovich v. Lorain Journal: Spence v. Flynten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume26en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1992-1993en_US
dc.description.pages1221en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record