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dc.contributor.authorPetregal, Laura A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T16:26:00Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T16:26:00Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citation27 Creighton L. Rev. 875 (1993-1994)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40052
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Before Congress enacted legislation to regulate private broadcast communications, the airwaves were filled with a "cacophony of competing voices, none of which could be clearly and predictably heard." Market forces alone had failed to allocate fairly limited broadcast frequencies. To alleviate this chaos, Congress passed the Communications Act of 1934 ("Act"), which created a public system of permits and licenses, to govern the private control of the broadcast industry. Congress created the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") to enforce the Act and to allocate broadcast licenses. However, Congress did not grant unrestrained authority to the FCC...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleUnfair Treatment of the Fairness Doctrine: Arkansas AFL-CIO v. FCCen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume27en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1993-1994en_US
dc.description.pages875en_US


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