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dc.contributor.authorMueller, Kimen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T16:45:26Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T16:45:26Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citation28 Creighton L. Rev. 1255 (1994-1995)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40113
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|In the Spring of 1994, crime topped the public's list of concerns. In response, measures designed to lock more people up - like "three strikes and you're out" - moved to the top of political agendas. Riding on the same wave of anti-crime and anti-criminal fervor, elected officials nationwide introduced a range of measures to eliminate rights and privileges previously enjoyed by inmates already incarcerated. A special target of the political wrath was inmates' civil rights litigation filed under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 ("Section 1983"). State legislatures passed bills erecting higher barriers to inmates' access to the courts. Both houses of Congress introduced similar measures, some of which became law in 1994.|In the quieter chambers of the federal judicial branch, inmate cases also were the focus of attention, for different reasons and certainly not as a new sensation. For the last fourteen years at least,the federal courts have faced a growing caseload and workload challenge posed by inmate cases filed under Section 1983. By 1992, these filings numbered nearly 30,000, and constituted 13% of the courts' total civil case filings nationwide...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleInmates' Civil Rights Cases and the Federal Courts: Insights Derived from a Field Research Project in the Eastern District of Californiaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume28en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1994-1995en_US
dc.description.pages1255en_US


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