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dc.contributor.authorDery, George IIIen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T18:44:12Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T18:44:12Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citation30 Creighton L. Rev. 353 (1996-1997)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40179
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Imagine living in a world where government officials patrol the streets with cameras so powerful that they can see through clothing. No matter how many blouses or coats a person cocoons oneself in, officers are still able to discern the asthma inhaler in one's pocket, or the wedding ring box a lover is hiding from his soon to be fianc6. Further, this technology can be trained on the citizen from a distance, so that no one will even be aware that he or she is being surveilled. Indeed, people are more likely to assume that they are the subject of surveillance, for the devices are so common that they are placed on the light bars of every police cruiser and even carried by officers walking a beat. The individual cannot escape the government's stare by hiding at home, for the camera's eye can penetrate common building materials. The state therefore is privy to visits to the bathroom and intimate moments between spouses. Such technology is not only currently feasible; an operational prototype is being tested and refined under a Federal Government grant...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleRemote Frisking Down to the Skin: Government Searching Technology Powerful Enough to Locate Holes in Fourth Amendment Fundamentalsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume30en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1996-1997en_US
dc.description.pages353en_US


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