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dc.contributor.authorWinterhof, Janis J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T20:03:51Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T20:03:51Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citation31 Creighton L. Rev. 1251 (1997-1998)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40251
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|Over 200 years have passed since the drafting of the earliest constitutions, and although education is supposed to be "vital" and "essential," many believe our states have failed to provide for a "thorough and efficient," "adequate," or even minimal education systems. The problems underlying our states failure to secure minimal educational systems stem from large wealth-based disparities in school district funding. These disparities exist due to heavy reliance upon local property taxes as the primary means of financing education throughout the United States. With a heavy reliance on local property taxes as the method of funding education, school districts located in areas with low property values cannot raise sufficient funds to support their schools. Thus, many poor districts are forced to pass higher tax levies. Even with additional tax levies, a school district may still be starved for funds and might be required to rely on borrowing to support its schools, thereby creating a cycle of debt...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleFrom Rationing Toilet Paper to Computer Hook-Ups with Moscow: Wealth-Based Disparities in Public School Financing Are Held Unconstitutional in Derolph v. Ohioen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume31en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note1997-1998en_US
dc.description.pages1251en_US


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