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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, W. Ray.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T20:33:29Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T20:33:29Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citation34 Creighton L. Rev. 611 (2000-2001)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40370
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|In the past three decades, the United States government has largely abandoned its mission of uplifting the downtrodden. Protection of the poor and dis-empowered has waned, and preservation of civil rights and affirmative action initiatives is withering. The federal judiciary displays what one observer calls a "growing discomfort with the slightest hint of special preferences." With one notable exception, the collective national consciousness is becoming less sympathetic toward efforts on behalf of racial minorities and other traditionally underrepresented groups, notwithstanding claims of past or present discrimination. The exception is the protection of the disabled. No longer are disabled persons summarily excluded from America's plenty. The position, if not the sentiment, has shifted from indifference and exclusion to accommodation and differential treatment. Ironically, disabled individuals, are gaining significant protection while the identifiable minorities are losing ground...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleHand-Up or Handout - The Americans with Disabilities Act and Unreasonable Accomodation of Learning Disabled Bar Applicants: Toward a New Paradigmen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume34en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2000-2001en_US


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