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dc.contributor.authorTiritilli, Eric W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T22:03:50Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T22:03:50Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citation35 Creighton L. Rev. 729 (2001-2002)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40407
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|More than one hundred years ago, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis first articulated the legal hypothesis that an individual has a right to be free from public exposure of private information about his or her life. However, the proposed right of privacy has been frequently criticized as incompatible with the First Amendment's protection of free expression. Scholars note that the right of privacy proposed by Warren and Brandeis creates a conflict between the right of an individual to control information about themselves and the constitutionally protected right of free speech. The Supreme Court of the United States has rarely addressed the conflicting nature of these two competing interests. The Supreme Court's limited treatment of the conflicting rights, and of the right to privacy in general, has led previous commentators to declare the state of the law "a mess"...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleYou Never Call Me Anymore: Bartnicki v. Vopper and the Supreme Court's Abridgement of the Right of Privacy in Favor of the First Amendment Right of a Free Pressen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume35en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2001-2002en_US
dc.description.pages729en_US


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