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dc.contributor.authorBennett, Steven C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNiccum, Thomas M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-18T15:49:21Z
dc.date.available2013-02-18T15:49:21Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citation36 Creighton L. Rev. 607 (2002-2003)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40459
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|In 1975, when we graduated from high school together, the modern computer age was still in its infancy. Although most major businesses and institutions had some computerized records and operations, the volume of electronic (versus paper) records was still relatively low. The personal computer revolution, desktop networking, the Internet, and e-mail as a common form of business communication all had yet to occur. These developments, over the last quarter century, for most businesses and institutions have produced a vast mountain of data in electronic form. Many of the most recent developments in computer science and technology, moreover, have made it even easier to store and, increasingly, to search, this enormous quantity of data. The ability to create, maintain and use this huge volume of data raises important technical and legal issues. In essence, for most businesses, it is technically possible to keep virtually every electronic record that comes into existence. Indeed, there are costs and other burdens associated with attempting to eliminate electronic records on...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleTwo Views from the Data Mountainen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume36en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2002-2003en_US
dc.description.pages607en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorFiroz, Muhammaden_US


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