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dc.contributor.authorEdwin Sladeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-28T16:23:39Z
dc.date.available2013-05-28T16:23:39Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citation46 Creighton L. Rev. 27(2012-2013)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/42887
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The United States is an oil-hungry nation, and the Keystone pipeline addition could bring new source of oil to sate America's appetite. The proposed pipeline is a direct route connecting oil from Canada to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast, with a stop along the way to pick up U.S. domestic production in Montana and North Dakota. With high gasoline prices, U.S. reliance on oil from turbulent places like the Middle East, an high unemployment, one would think construction on Keystone would begin quickly. Yet the permitting process for Keystone has been anything but quick. The permit application, originally filled in 2008, is now projected to be approved or rejected outright at the beginning of 2013, five years later...en_US
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.titleThe Keystone Pipeline Addition: Assessing the Potential Benefits of Reduced Gasolie Prices and Increased National Securityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume46en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.description.note2012-2013en_US
dc.description.pages27en_US


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